Shadow of Aldeberan

The shade of the monument in the shadow of Aldeberan’s Grove is very thin, and marks the end of the line of mining. It is the great beacon of the Sabbat’s call to all the gods and to all men. In the distance the low walls of Arkham are crumbling, and the great hearths of Innsmouth are whispering with fright. A shadow covers the western slope of the hill, and the golden spires and domes of New Town tower afar off. Westward the faces of the valley slope, but still they stare black.

The first people were almost from the valley itself, and all that valley was the bane of their days. For over a century they had resented the intrusion of a garrulous people from the upper woods, and had regarded them as strangers and usurpers of their lands and liberties. Their ways were seldom listened to, and only by the prayers of their devoted priestesses did they attempt to erect a tower on the top of the hill. Their prayer was that no man should come within the walls of the city, for these walls were the tokens of their sovereignty and law.

It was at last that the people of the valley came to the hearth and prayed. It was at last that the valley’s priests decided whether they would erect a tower in the steeply descending part of the hill or whether they would leave the hill alone. The tower was built, and now it lies lonely in the shadow of Sentinel Hill, where the dark hill becomes a bower with crooked doorways, and the shrines of the little gods shine with strange colours. The rumblings of the Witch-Cult are terrible, and there is a peril in the footsteps of old Fenris. Nor can men sleep safe at night amidst the blasphemy of the Sabbat and the fear of the Great Ones.

The hill and valley have grown great, and the high places of the valley are very old, for only the mind of a village or a small village can conceive the height and mystery of Arkham. Some day a younger generation of men will not know the fear of the hills and the boding gloom of the Sentinel, for fear to this day grows thicker every day. The hills and valleys are like old trees that must be borne by the wind. The men of Innsmouth have chosen to grow old in ignorance, and the trees of the valley have withered away, so that their youth is but lost.

At last there came to Innsmouth a child not of pure blood, nor of a blood pure of heart. The boy was not old because he was born in the valley; but because his parents had come from far and settled in that city. He was born before the founding of any city, but his birth was of old memory. The memory of old Fenris came to him at the hour of the storm, and his eye must have seen the mist and the snow as it fell from the hills. So he was a child of the storm, but of the moon and of the valley.

When young Sir Eric was not at home he played like a child, and was nursed by his brothers and father. He was fed mostly in the church kitchen, but in the day he would wander among the ruins of old houses, and ask old Fenris of the fears and marvels which come to him from the Witch-Cult. Once he came home and found his father and brother gone, and a small grey cottage without a door or a little window. The cottage was empty, and Sir Eric was gone as well. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

But the boy did not stay away; and when he came home he found the town full of laughter and gaiety, and old Fenris full of lore and longings. And when they spoke of that boy they told, ‘Fenris is wise; he has looked long into the eyes of the young man that is now gone; for he thought that we were of old acquaintance.’

So Sir Eric grew wise, and learned from his father the things which are ever after sought after. When he was old he went to the court of the Great Ones and sought for those things, but old Fenris and his children kept him away. So when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

But the boy did not stay away; and when he came home he found that the child had gone away. And when he came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

But the boy did not stay away; and when he came home he found that the child had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

So when the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

So when the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

So when the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

So when the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

So when the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

So when the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

So when the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

So when the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away.

So when the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

So when the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’ And when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away.

Posted in AI

thunderstorms around here

I keep finding interesting patterns in somewhat random sources, and am totally inspired by the thunderstorms in Michigan. Living on the lake means whacky weather and the 3 or 4 days that I have been awakened at 3 am and had to rush around the dark house to close windows has been an adventure, but not much help in the “good nights rest” department.

Image Stylings

The phone aspect ratio betrays the origins of the image, but composing with the idea of picasso in mind is really a lot of fun. Flowers have faces.

Due for an AI post

I am well past due for a post on the AI work that I am trying to launch, but other than a challenge getting cuda to run properly on the machine, everything is slowly coming into place and I need to start collecting images. I am currently going through older images and running them at higher resolution like today’s.

It is interesting to me the way the higher resolution ones mimic some of the static-y bits in terms of small repetitions. As of now, it is also just a trip down memory lane.