found my place in Escanaba

my place

I remember being a young gothy kid that hung out in graveyards because they were cool and I find it really compelling to have seen this stone from the road and had it bring me into the cemetery. Shortly after I saw this, I started circling the cemetery on my walks and I am sure the only reason I didn’t dive in sooner was the whole cliche of the thing.

As it stands this is the biggest park inside the town and the gates are open most of the time (I have never seen them closed). I think Every Day the Same Dream called this “a quiet place” and that sticks with me even now. It is quiet.

I fear that if I were to stay here, the only option for me is the grave.

dark moments

from the sea
looking back
from the stars

A little triptych put together influenced by the onslaught of spring in the UP and a desire to make art. These have been printed.

Posted in art

Spring Lake Nuance

https://ruby-yacht.github.io/miichgan/springan1/images/index.html

I am looking for a certain nuance in the images and as the seasons change I have a strong interest in capturing that. These images do not quite get there. I used a bit of a different method for generating the images, shooting 3 short 1080p videos, stringing them together and exporting the frames. I posted the video which is embarrassingly bad: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=inbXrJForl8 and made it available for download as well. This process was much faster than shooting 200 images and made them very much similar. I think I had an initial FID score of 88 after about 2000 steps, but the images also felt a little off so I ran another 2k. The score bumped up to 109 but the images felt a little better. The latent space walk video is pretty boring, except for perhaps the texture of the water. ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axBomAHiUGk )

Visually this feels like composition, I am thinking that if I can dial in my images I can start to predict the output a little better. There are some interesting patterns emerging because of the trees which I expect to see budding soon and am looking forward to the next comparison. Keep an eye out for springan2.

Here is my project page, and I am happy to share images if there is a desire.

https://ruby-yacht.github.io/miichgan/springan1/index.html

The Winters Tale

There is nothing really special about this post, I wanted to start putting some images through GANS to see what manner of artifacts they created. The biggest challenge so far is dealing with the fact that input is a huge number of images and output is a huge number of images. So I experiment with that a little too.

Here are about 240 odd images that I shot while going on my usual 3 mile walk in Escanaba. My phone has pretty good image quality and pretty nearly a 2×1 width x height ratio. So I used photoshop to split the images in half and make them squares 1024×1024. I really do like the way this grid shows the images side by side so they are complete most of the time.

The images are cc rubaiyat. Feel free to use them, with credit, if they help.

From these images I went thru 4000 training steps on StyleGAN2:

The style-based GAN architecture (StyleGAN) yields state-of-the-art results in data-driven unconditional generative image modeling. We expose and analyze several of its characteristic artifacts, and propose changes in both model architecture and training methods to address them. In particular, we redesign generator normalization, revisit progressive growing, and regularize the generator to encourage good conditioning in the mapping from latent vectors to images. In addition to improving image quality, this path length regularizer yields the additional benefit that the generator becomes significantly easier to invert. This makes it possible to reliably detect if an image is generated by a particular network.

– runwayml, StyleGAN2

imagined MighiGAN

The results are quite nice though the visual artifacts of the StyleGAN are quite evident. At this point I am still interested in these artifacts although they become more obvious the more data I put thru the system. As an attempt to create images from life, this is interesting I need to figure out a way to present the images and I look forward to testing different aspects like season and subject on this method of image creation. It is still very rough.

Shadow of Aldeberan

The shade of the monument in the shadow of Aldeberan’s Grove is very thin, and marks the end of the line of mining. It is the great beacon of the Sabbat’s call to all the gods and to all men. In the distance the low walls of Arkham are crumbling, and the great hearths of Innsmouth are whispering with fright. A shadow covers the western slope of the hill, and the golden spires and domes of New Town tower afar off. Westward the faces of the valley slope, but still they stare black.

The first people were almost from the valley itself, and all that valley was the bane of their days. For over a century they had resented the intrusion of a garrulous people from the upper woods, and had regarded them as strangers and usurpers of their lands and liberties. Their ways were seldom listened to, and only by the prayers of their devoted priestesses did they attempt to erect a tower on the top of the hill. Their prayer was that no man should come within the walls of the city, for these walls were the tokens of their sovereignty and law.

It was at last that the people of the valley came to the hearth and prayed. It was at last that the valley’s priests decided whether they would erect a tower in the steeply descending part of the hill or whether they would leave the hill alone. The tower was built, and now it lies lonely in the shadow of Sentinel Hill, where the dark hill becomes a bower with crooked doorways, and the shrines of the little gods shine with strange colours. The rumblings of the Witch-Cult are terrible, and there is a peril in the footsteps of old Fenris. Nor can men sleep safe at night amidst the blasphemy of the Sabbat and the fear of the Great Ones.

The hill and valley have grown great, and the high places of the valley are very old, for only the mind of a village or a small village can conceive the height and mystery of Arkham. Some day a younger generation of men will not know the fear of the hills and the boding gloom of the Sentinel, for fear to this day grows thicker every day. The hills and valleys are like old trees that must be borne by the wind. The men of Innsmouth have chosen to grow old in ignorance, and the trees of the valley have withered away, so that their youth is but lost.

At last there came to Innsmouth a child not of pure blood, nor of a blood pure of heart. The boy was not old because he was born in the valley; but because his parents had come from far and settled in that city. He was born before the founding of any city, but his birth was of old memory. The memory of old Fenris came to him at the hour of the storm, and his eye must have seen the mist and the snow as it fell from the hills. So he was a child of the storm, but of the moon and of the valley.

When young Sir Eric was not at home he played like a child, and was nursed by his brothers and father. He was fed mostly in the church kitchen, but in the day he would wander among the ruins of old houses, and ask old Fenris of the fears and marvels which come to him from the Witch-Cult. Once he came home and found his father and brother gone, and a small grey cottage without a door or a little window. The cottage was empty, and Sir Eric was gone as well. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

But the boy did not stay away; and when he came home he found the town full of laughter and gaiety, and old Fenris full of lore and longings. And when they spoke of that boy they told, ‘Fenris is wise; he has looked long into the eyes of the young man that is now gone; for he thought that we were of old acquaintance.’

So Sir Eric grew wise, and learned from his father the things which are ever after sought after. When he was old he went to the court of the Great Ones and sought for those things, but old Fenris and his children kept him away. So when Sir Eric came home he found that the boy had gone away. And the old man called to his son and said, ‘You must not go out so long a night; but come again soon.’

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Posted in AI